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Q. The GB  I/II/III/IV books - Do these books build on each other or are they stand alone?

Q. Do I need to buy all the old versions of the Get Buffed! book? Or can I only be the most recent one?

Q. What's the GB III book like?

Q. Are there any good or great books out there that show photos and list how to do certain exercises? Maybe an encyclopedia of exercises?

Q. What's the difference between the Get Buffed!™ book and the Book of Muscle? 

Q. Is Get Buffed!™ similar, updated info, or old info compared to The Book of Muscle?

Q. I am trying to decide between the Get Buffed! book and the Book of Muscle and I'm just wondering what the difference between the two is.  Will I get the same results from each book, or is each designed for different goals? 

Q. I am in Stage 3 of Get Buffed II and it's been a sweet journey of fulfillment.  I'd like to do your arm specialization program and write a maintenance program for myself for the lower body day(s).  With Get Buffed I, II and III in my library, would the next practical purchase be How to Write a Strength Programs book?

Q. Do the Get Buffed!™ DVDs cover everything in the Get Buffed!™ books?

Q. Do you have any nutritional recommendations for a “hardgainer” in the Get Buffed! range?

Q. Is there any Olympic style lifting in any of the Get Buffed! series?

Q. What value can I get from the 'Ian King's Guide to Individual Stretching' program?

Q. What the 'Ian King's Guide to the Squat' DVD/video like?

Q. What the 'Ian King's Guide to the Bench Press' DVD/video like?

Q. What's the difference between the Get Buffed! 'Ian King's Guide' Series Squat, Bench Press, and Deadlift - and the KSI Ian King's Guide to Powerlifts; and the Get Buffed! 'Ian King's Guide' Series Power Clean, Power Snatch, and Overhead lift - and the KSI guide to Olympic lifts? 

Q. Are there Get Buffed DVDs/videos for the Get Buffed! II and III books/programs?

Q. I would like to purchase various Get Buffed! products - is there a package price?

Q. What the value in order the Get Buffed!™ Total Package?

Q. Are Get Buffed! workouts male oriented?

Q. Are your training methods applicable to females?

Q. Is Get Buffed! suitable for women who are not athletes or body builders?

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Q. The GB I/II/III books - Do these books build on each other or are they stand alone?

I believe so!
 
GB 1, 2 and 3 build on each other both in terms of the generic programs Ian provides and the excellent information Ian provides in each chapter of each book. eg Ian does not tell you everything, he tells you what you need to know and the trilogy of GB's reflects this very clearly! (after reading the first you'll be 'ready' for the second, etc)  
 
the Olympic lifts DVD is exceptional, extremely practical, like all of Ian's material is and complements the Olympic lifting program in GB3 and any future individual programs you'll write for yourself in the future!
--Mitchell

I agree with Mitchell. The GB original has a great program and video set of Ian training to show you exactly how to execute the program. This is a great intro to Ian's material for the end user.

GB 2 is a little more in depth with the introduction of control drills and many of Ian's other "trademark" methods that he felt the world was ready for after the success of the first book

GB3 This is the advanced version of the GB series. The way Ian cycles the equipment and uses techniques is phenomenal. This is a wonderful example of how to use many techniques to suit your needs.

Actually there are enough ideas in the books to keep you training for year to come!!

I would have to say that anything you buy of Ian's is going to help your training. If you are an end user, there is plenty of information in the get buffed or end user range.

If you want professional development material for physical prep, the specialization videos are the very best you can get in the industry.

And finally, with everything else said, the o lifts DVD is awesome with Ian actually coaching an athlete. Fantastic stuff!!!! I will say the time you spend on this video will help your lifting without question.
--Elliott

I got the Get Buffed Total Package at the end of last year and it has been a great investment.

Ian's GB material alone is something I will be able to apply to my own training for many years to come. The GB video is a great way to watch and listen to Ian go through the GB program and the various lifts.

Is it just me, or does anyone else find themselves in training hearing Ian's voice say "Bang it up!" or "Gerrit outta there"    

If you go for the GB package you will definitely not be disappointed.
--Ian
 
I agree with this. I have watched that O lift DVD several times. Every time I watch it I get something new from it. Ian is just doing what Ian does but he has such a high level of unconscious competence that the rest of us need to watch it several times to get the layers of information offered.
--Elliott

I'm a moderator on another online message board, and let's just say that when people ask for the three best books for the bodybuilding end user, I say GB 1, 2, and 3. Each volume adds to, and does not replace, the content of the preceding volume.

If you were to buy just one, I would say GB 1 because it covers the fundamentals of strength training so clearly and thoroughly. The other two are progressively more program-dense, but GB 1 covers training principles at the basic level better than any book aimed at the end-user market.

The one caveat is if you are a beginner needing more visual instruction, perhaps Book of Muscle is a better choice.

I will add that the Get Buffed series is aimed primarily at a market interested in getting bigger and stronger through weight training, but not necessarily at the sport of Olympic weightlifting per se, nor at a program involving OL variations for the development of strength qualities. There is indeed an explosive strength as well as an OL program in GB III, but again this is not the primary aim of the series. I am certain that Ian could produce such a volume (intended solely for progressing in the Olympic lifts) that would be outstanding, but GB is not aimed in that fashion.
--erp7e
 
Get Buffed! I, II and III have no overlap, and written with continuity in content and program. Each book advances your training knowledge and provides a more advanced 3 month program.
--Ian King

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Q. Do I need to buy all the old versions of the Get Buffed! book? Or can I only be the most recent one?


In the Get Buffed! book range there is no 'old' or 'new'. The three GB books are a sequel of information and programs. There is no overlap or redundancy. They build on the concepts from the first to the last book, like a carpet being rolled out!
--Ian King

Q. What's the Get Buffed! III book like?

I have just finished reading GB III in its entirety - This is an amazing finale to the "trilogy of training"! I am towards the end of my second decade in the physical preparation and rehab fields and have never seen a more complete and progressive application of training principles!

It is evidence that Ian has so much more to offer the training world than what has been published in the public domain previously- keep your eyes out - cuz I have a feeling you will see this more on this website than anywhere else!

A suggestion will be to brush up on what's out there now- Ian has an interesting method of progressing anyone to the next level provided they mastered the foundation!
--Mike

Q. Are there any good or great books out there that show photos and list how to do certain exercises? Maybe an encyclopedia of exercises?

The absolute best book, no contest, is, are you ready?? THE BOOK OF MUSCLE. Who is the author you ask? Why, Ian King and Lou Shuler. Am I biased in offering this recommendation? Absolutely yes and most certainly no! Buy this book. There is no other book for the general population that so accurately depicts, both visually and with works, how to perform exercises the way Ian teaches them.

In fact, if I may be so bold, having this book will put you ahead of 99% of the 'general body-building' population.
--Darren

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Q. What's the difference between the Get Buffed! book and the Book of Muscle?

Compare GB and BOM to that of DVD restoration and color enhancement of classic movies. You can certainly have a great experience and see the value in the improved product. You will probably gain more viewers and spark a new founded appreciation for the original classic. Yet it is the original classic people will return to. It is this rediscovery of the classic that provides a deeper appreciation for the "remake". So, whether one is introduced first to the old or the new, they come full circle and reap a more complete understanding of Ian's holistic approach.
--Eric
 
The basic differences are:

* GB books are based on 4 workouts a week. BOM book is based on 3 workouts a week.
* BOM has pictures. GB hasn’t – text only.
* BOM is hard back. GB are softer covers.
* BOM seeks to cover all aspects in one book. GB spreads it out over three.
* BOM references more research/science. GB doesn’t.
* BOM was written by two people. GB books by one.
* The GB books are self-published for the more committed end of the market (hard core) and the BOM is published by a mainstream publishing house and is aimed to appeal to the masses.
--Ian King

Q. Is Get Buffed! similar, updated info, or old info compared to "The Book of Muscle"?

Get Buffed! is similar only in that you will see the consistency in my recommendations. It is different in that it is written for a more hard core audience, involves 4 day a week programs, is self-published and has no pictures.

I wrote the GB I book before the BOM book, but you won't be disappointed with having them both! The advantage of self-publishing is I can say what I want - no one is editing my work, as occurs in mainstream publishing! Appreciate your appointing me the 'king'!
--Ian King

Q. I am trying to decide between the Get Buffed! book and the Book of Muscle and I'm just wondering what the difference between the two is.  Will I get the same results from each book, or is each designed for different goals? 

The Book of Muscle is a complete training book for beginner, Intermediate and advanced level strength trainers with the emphasis on fitness. There are 6 months worth of generalized programs, a nutritional program and a good deal on stretching. If you were wondering how to do an exercise, there are pictures in Book of Muscle. The Get Buffed Series of books are strength training books with information that you’ll not get anywhere else. The Get Buffed Series books I, II and III  you might call beginner, intermediate and advanced respectively. There are no pictures, just a good deal of very useful information.

Are you looking to stay fit or Get Buffed? Would you like three day per week training or four days per week? How much training experience have you had?

If you are a relative beginner I’d say get the Book of Muscle, If you are an Intermediate trainee, either will do and If you’d consider yourself advanced and are looking for challenge in your life, Get Buffed III is your answer. Trevor I hope this helped. There are reviews of the book coming out in the next two Get Buffed Newsletters.
--Ian King

Q. I am in Stage 3 of Get Buffed II and it's been a sweet journey of fulfillment.  I'd like to do your arm specialization program and write a maintenance program for myself for the lower body day(s).  With Get Buffed I, II and III in my library, would the next practical purchase be How to Write a Strength Programs book?

Yes, you are ready for the 'How to Write' book, which can only be ordered from this web site.  Great to see you ready to take responsibility for your individualized program!
--Ian King

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Q. Do the Get Buffed!™ DVDs cover everything in the Get Buffed!™ books?

Yes, the GB DVDs do cover everything in the GB books.  Let me explain how!

Firstly, the GB workout video (soon to be available on DVD) covers the workout in it’s entirety from the GB 1 book. Then the control drills and abs that are introduced in GB II are covered in the ‘Ian King’s Guide to …’ dvds, and of course stretching is also.

As the programs get more advanced eg. GB III, you will need the power lifts (Ian King's Guide to ...The Squat...The Bench Press..... The Dead Lift) and Olympic lifts (Ian King's Guide to...The Power Clean...The Power Snatch....The Overhead Explosive Lifts) DVDs. So they cover all bases of all the three GB books and workouts! Which is why the Get Buffed! Total Package is so great value!
--Ian King 

Q. Do you have any nutritional recommendations for a “hardgainer” in the Get Buffed! range?

The issues other than training (nutrition, sleep etc.) are all covered in these books – information that should address the ‘so-called’ hard-gainer, a concept that I don’t really buy into.
--Ian King

Q. Is there any Olympic style lifting in any of the Get Buffed! series?

The GB series includes a DVD/Video option ‘Ian King’s Guide to the Olympic Lifts’, but this is separate to the GB DVD/video program that takes you through the GB I program. As Olympic lifts were not used in GB I program, they are not on the GB video. Olympic lifts are shown as options in the GB III program in the GB III book. If you want guidance in Olympic lifts you will want to order the 'Ian King's Guide to the Power Cleans, Power Snatches, and Explosive Overhead lifts DVDs/videos.
--Ian King

Q. What value can I get from the 'Ian King's Guide to Individual Stretching' program?

Wanted to email you a note of thanks for the "education" I received from you concerning stretching - more specifically - static stretching.

Prior to learning of your methods I could sense that my training would come to an end due to an increase in the amount of small injuries I was getting ( I was 36 years old at the time). I was also visiting the chiropractor once every 3 weeks.

Then I read and incorporated your stretching article (lazy mans guide to stretching) on the t-mag web site. Those nagging injuries started to disappear.

Next I attended your 3 day boot camp in Toronto which I followed up by obtaining your video series on flexibility. This allowed me to train injury free for the next 8 years and reduce my visits to the chiropractor to less than once per year

Here's where it gets ugly - I started to read about dynamic stretching and how all the "experts" preferred this to static stretching. They said static stretching pre-workout reduced the amount of load one could use. Apparently dynamic stretching allowed for a better warm-up and allowed one to lift greater loads. Also, studies were being referred to that showed static stretching pre-workout did not reduce or eliminate soft tissue injuries.

So what did I do? I decided to stop all static stretching and started to incorporate a dynamic stretching routine pre-workout. Did it allow me to lift greater loads? No. Did I start to acquire little nagging (and some not so little) injuries? Yes.

Here's the embarrassing part. I maintained this pre-workout dynamic stretching routine for the last 10 months. I guess I really, really wanted to give it a chance. After all, the experts were recommending it and apparently there were studies to back up their claims. I even purchased and read a book from a Ph D who specialized in back injuries and the rehab of these back injuries. Even he specifically recommends no stretching of the back.

I am now 45 years old and I was back to visiting the chiropractor once every 3 weeks. My flexibility was to the point where I had great difficulty getting into my car - lack of flexibility in my back and neck and those nagging injuries were accumulating. I moved like a robot when getting out of bed in the morning due to stiffness. It was then that I decided to go back to my old method of static stretching.

After one thorough session of STATIC stretching my back stiffness was significantly reduced within 24 hours. Within 48 hours my entire body had less stiffness. I then decided to get really radical and try static stretching pre work-out. The workout was one of the best I've had in a long, long time. Greater range of motion and no aches and pain at certain joint angles. Did I have to reduce the load being lifter? No.

Ian - please consider this a long term (approximately 9 years) experiment verifying your theories (again) on static stretching.
Thank you very much!
--Al

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Q. What the 'Ian King's Guide to the Squat' DVD/video like?

I have the Squat video and I have noticed, after viewing it, I am much more aware of other people's technique in squat. And of course nobody is squatting Ian's way, so my mind instantly goes to " they are doing it wrong", but I guess there is no wrong (well in some cases there is a definite error  ), there's only a different way. But I still say Ian King's way is better , and would be more beneficial to everyone who decided to implement it in their programs.
--Luzy

Q. What the 'Ian King's Guide to the Bench Press' DVD/video like?

Ah, the power of the bench press video....  

Today I switched gym membership from one of the larger, well known, commercial chains to a local gym just 5 minutes drive away (they opened just a few months ago).  While at the larger gym, I was never troubled or interrupted during my workouts and happily did my own thing following King best practice.

Today, my first day at the new gym (which is more 'hardcore', if you like) I was being watched while steadily going through my warm-up sets during alternating between bench press and seated row, and then on through my work sets in which the weights were upped considerably.

When I finished my last seated row, a member asked me to spot for him on the bench press (I think he'd already done a set or two). I asked him *how* he wanted spotting and he asked what I meant.

I went through Ian's spotting recommendations when bench pressing and I told the member I would only come in when he asked and not before, and that I would follow his speed of movement - the member seemed slightly taken aback, probably because he assumed I would just perform an upright row for him when things got tricky 

I observed his benching and noticed several issues - his right arm dominating, the joint angle of the knee was not acute, the position of his right foot was further forward that his left, body position not central on the bench, his scapula was not retracted etc etc.

Being careful with my words and not wanting to appear overly clever (you get my drift?) I mentioned a few of these and made some suggestions that would help his benching. So, taking the weight down he tried out benching "King style" and liked it.

I have a friend for life now (and a future spotter I hope when things get heavy in Get Buffed!).  I never expected to make use of the knowledge I learned from the Bench Press video so soon. Ian, the bench press video is excellent, with lots of not so little details that are so important when nailing correct technique. Cheers ta,
--Ian

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Q. What's the difference between the Get Buffed! 'Ian King's Guide' Series Squat, Bench Press, and Deadlift - and the KSI Guide to Powerlifts; and the Get Buffed! 'Ian King's Guide' Series Power Clean, Power Snatch, and Overhead lift - and the KSI guide to Olympic lifts? 

The two video programs you refer to are the same footage, just packaged differently. In our professional development KSI range we have maintained our tradition of using the large, A4 size plastic cases, for space efficiency and looks on the professional's library shelf. In the Get Buffed! range, we have maintained our tradition of the 'Ian King's Guide to the Squat', 'Ian King's Guide to the Deadlift', etc., range in smaller cases. The smaller Get Buffed! cases have the Get Buffed logo and coloring, and the larger plastic KSI cases have a more typical KSI cover, including shots from the videos.

It really comes down to what case you want, what outside packaging you want. The GB range also allows purchase of smaller segments of footage, e.g.. just the squat, whereas the professional version is only packaged altogether - all three Olympic Lifts or all three Power Lifts.
--Ian King

Q. Are there Get Buffed DVDs/videos for  the Get Buffed! II and III books/programs?

There are no Get Buffed! II or III DVDs/videos, but the exercises covered in the GB video will cover most if not all the exercises used in the GB II and III programs.
--Ian King

Q. I would like to purchase various Get Buffed! products - is there a package price?

All the GB packages are listed and described on order page at this site. If you want to see all packages in one view, click ‘Packages’ in the search function at the products page.
--Ian King

Q. What the value in order the Get Buffed!™ Total Package?

I received the total package in early December (promptly - just days after ordering here in the UK) but wifey wouldn't allow me to open them up until Christmas Day - she's a hard woman!)

I have had the opportunity of viewing the Get Buffed! videos; the Squat, Bench Press and Deadlift; and the Control Drills.

As someone who trains alone, and have done so since last February following Ian's methods, the video's are an outstanding addition to the written material I have.

The video's are of excellent quality and the information contained within them are invaluable. I have learned so much in the short time that I have had the video's but they will require repeat viewing and much note taking to take it all in.

I am looking forward to beginning the Get Buffed! program in a few weeks times and I hope to raise various questions and queries here on the forum in due course.
--Ian

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Q. Are Get Buffed! workouts male oriented?

I understand the logo I have selected (the flexed bicep) may give that impression. I am not so sure that the training result is as gender oriented as the cover suggests.

I use these same training methods on female athletes, including ones with ‘fear of bulking’. So take note it is being done. Now whether any the workouts are applicable to any given female is no more a given than that they will suit every male - remember, these are generic programs, and provided for mass education purposes - personally, professionally - I always seek to individualize.

My recommendations to any female considering the GB workouts -  give it a go. And take take take heart in the concept of detraining or involution, knowing it will go away if you/they didn't like the outcome!
--Ian King

Q.  Are your training methods applicable to females?

Most of my writings in public domain are may appear to be geared towards men. I have written for T-mag (note testosterone), Men’s Health (note men) and the product range Get Buffed! has a bulging bicep on the front cover. So I understand this perception. I have yet to receive article requests from E-mag.com (estrogen), or Women’s Health. I have trained a lot of women athletes, and the way I write a program for a female athlete is the same way I write a program for a male.
--Ian King
 

Q. Is Get Buffed! suitable for women who are not athletes or body builders?

Yes, if you are up do doing that frequency of training – i.e. 4 days a week.
--Ian King

 

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